For event organisers

So glad you’re interested in me presenting at your conference. To save us both a little time, here’s a some information about how I approach speaking.

Each year I prepare two new talks, the first is a 20 minute talk for community events and meet-ups, the second is a longer talk for larger industry events.

This year’s talks

My short talk topic this year is ‘Designing with CSS Grid.’ It’s a technical talk that introduces people to using CSS Grid while designing creative layouts.

My longer talk topic is ‘Art Directing The Web.’ It’s a design talk that explains the concept of art direction, demonstrates how to use layout to convey a message and then shows how to implement those layouts using CSS Grid.


I normally write two versions of my longer talk, one running to 45 minutes, the other to 60 minutes. My talks are family friendly and if one includes content people might find upsetting, I’ll let them know and ask them to “look away now.” I’m happy to answer questions at community events and meet-ups but I’ve never found Q&A sessions at larger events to be successful, so I don’t include time for them. Presentation slides are available online and I’ll mention the URL at the start of my talk.


Paying my fees

I’m not backed by a large company, so I charge a fee to speak at larger industry conferences. That fee varies according to the ticket price. I charge a £1,000 non-refundable booking fee, and expect to be paid the balance within 30 days of an event.

I waive my fees for community or (nearly) free conferences but I still require my accommodation and transportation costs to be covered by an event.


Covering expenses

I also ask that organisers arrange and pay for accommodation one night before, during, and one night after an event, Economy class return airfare if the flight time is less than 5 hours, premium economy or business class if it’s over 5 hours. Reasonable transportation costs, including taxi fares or first class train travel to and from an airport. Hotel wifi and internet access.


Gifts and perks

Although it’s always nice to receive a gift, I’d prefer you donate an equivalent amount of money to WWF to support gorilla conservation.


Setup information

Audio

I prefer a lavalier/lapel or countryman/headset to a handheld microphone. I’ll let you and your technical team know well in advance if my presentation includes any audio and will test the connection and volume at the technical check before my talk.

Projecting

Presenting from my own laptop helps us ensure there’s less time spent, are fewer issues, setting up for my talk. My MacBook Pro supports both HDMI and Thunderbolt outputs and I provide my own Thunderbolt/DVI connector and presentation remote. I don‘t provide slides for use on any other computer.

Positioning

I realise that lecterns are convenient for hiding messy cables and putting conference branding on-stage, but they sometimes get in the way of delivering a great presentation. The best lecterns have low sides for reading notes at any angle. If they can be rotated slightly, they allow speakers to see their laptop screen without standing behind the lectern.


Introducing me

Here are several things you might say when introducing me to your audience:

Our next/keynote speaker is Andy Clarke. Andy’s a well-known digital designer, speaker, and writer who’s based in the UK.

Andy founded Stuff & Nonsense, one of the best-known web design studios, where he designed for Disney Store UK, Greenpeace, SunLife, and WWF.

Andy’s written three popular books on website design and development including Hardboiled Web Design and Transcending CSS.

Andy’s been called plenty of things since he started working on the web. His ego likes terms such as “Ambassador for CSS,” “industry prophet” and “inspiring,” but he’s most proud that Jeffrey Zeldman once called him a “triple-talented bastard.”

He really, really, loves gorillas.


Biography for publicity

Please use the following biography on your conference website and in any programme.

Andy Clarke is a well-known digital designer, speaker, and writer, based in the UK. His designs have helped companies around the world to increase their sales pipeline and revenue, and charities to increase the amount they receive through donations.

Andy founded Stuff & Nonsense, one of the best-known digital design studios, where he designed for Disney Store UK, Greenpeace, SunLife, and WWF.

He’s written three popular books on website design and development including ‘Hardboiled Web Design‘ and “Transcending CSS.‘

Andy’s been called plenty of things since he started working on the web. His ego likes terms such as “Ambassador for CSS,” “industry prophet” and “inspiring,” but he’s most proud that Jeffrey Zeldman (the godfather of web standards) once called him a “triple-talented bastard.”

Publicity photographs

Please download and use my official publicity photographs.

Oh. Don’t forget that parrot.


Availability

I’m available for hire to consult on and design products and websites. Based in North Wales, I travel regularly to work with clients world-wide.

Available from January 2019

Talk soon

For work enquiries email

Or call us on +44 (0)1745 851848

Studio

Stuff & Nonsense Ltd.
Eversleigh, Lon Capel
Gwaenysgor
Flintshire, North Wales
LL18 6EJ, UK