Inspired Design Decisions

Look outside the web and be inspired to make better design decisions

A weekly series of 52 website designs by Andy Clarke, influenced by the most inspiring art directors and graphic designers of the twentieth century. Learn about the background to each design, the techniques and technologies used to implement it, and how it might inspire more compelling, creative design for the web.

Say thank-you with a $10 one-off donation or support this project on Patreon from $4.99 per month.

I made this project to educate and motivate web professionals. I do not own the inspirational designs and my understanding is that using them is in correlation to Fair Right Use as this project is for teaching purposes and has no negative impact on any original works.
Inspiration for my design
My final design
This design was inspired by Otto Storch

Otto Storch

An influential member of the New York School of editorial and advertising designers, Otto Storch is best known for his work as the art director of woman’s magazine McCall’s in the 1950s and ’60s. Born in Brooklyn in 1913, Storch took classes with legendary Harper’s Bazaar art director Alexey Brodovitch. Inspired by Brodovitch’s opinionated approach to design, Storch wrote:

“Good art direction does not come from an uncertain person. I am capable of intense feeling and was willing to lose a popularity contest with departmental editors when necessary. The visual responsibility of the magazine was mine.”

Inspiration for my design
My final design
This design was inspired by Herb Lubalin

Herb Lubalin

Herb Lubalin was fascinated by how typography could be used for communication. He understood how a choice of typeface could fundamentally alter the look and sound of words to communicate messages to his readers. Lubalin is well-known for his work on Eros and Fact magazines, as well as Avant Garde for which he designed the ITC Avant Garde typeface. His studio worked on magazines, packaging, posters, and corporate identity designs, but his most adventurous and interesting work was for his own U&lc typographic journal. The most complete reference for Lubalin’s work is Adrian Shaughnessy’s ‘Herb Lubalin: American Graphic Designer’, first published by Unit Editions in 2012.

Inspiration for my design
My final design
This design was inspired by Bea Feitler

Bea Feitler

Bea Feitler has been described as “the pioneering female art director you’ve never heard of.” Only one exhibition has been staged about her work and one retrospective book published. “O Design de Bea Feitler,” written by her nephew, was published in her native Brazil in 2012. It took me months to track down a copy, but eventually, I found one.

Feitler combined Brodovitch’s mastery of the double-page spread with her choices of bold colors which were inspired by pop artists Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, and Andy Warhol, as well as street fashion and youth culture. I find her typographic designs especially fascinating, and especially how she often combined typography with deconstructed grids.

Inspiration for my design
My final design
This design was inspired by Alexey Brodovitch

Alexey Brodovitch

Alexey Brodovitch’s knowledge of photography gave his work its classic feel. Brodovitch often cropped photographs in unexpected ways, and he placed them off-centre—sometimes bleeding them outside the margins of a page—to create compositions which were full of energy and movement.

“Surprise quality can be achieved in many ways. It may be produced by a certain stimulating geometrical relationship between elements in the picture, or through the human interest of the situation photographed, or by calling our attention to some commonplace but fascinating thing we have never noticed before, or it can be achieved by looking at an everyday thing in a new interesting way.”

—Alexey Brodovitch

Inspired by Bradbury Thompson

Coming next week

Say thank-you with a $10 one-off donation or support this project on Patreon from $4.99 per month.